A experiment of ions

The "thread" will be found to be of neutral polarity.

This should form a charged capacitor, with the air being one plate and the bucket the other. Then try charging soap bubbles? It would act somewhat like an invisible semi-solid mass. Also, the charged air should self-repel, thus expanding and attaining a lower density than normal air.

Fill a large plastic bag with air, connect the two ends of a hollow plastic pipe to the bag, then install a small fan and an ion generator inside the pipe. The positive ion-wind from the needle will attract a surrounding negative sheath and build a "thread" structure of oppositely charged air.

Try immersing the thread-generator within a pool of CO2 mist and see if an upwards- directed thread will entrain and transport mist along with it.

This weird phenomenon might be explained using charged air concepts. Bath the needle in the output of a negative-ion generator. Volumes of opposite polarity would experience attraction forces, yet the array as a whole would be neutral.

Water vapor is a polar gas, and perhaps the high voltage electrodes can concentrate it or even provoke the formation of electrically stabilized aerogels made from water molecule chains or percolation structures. Place a large positive potential upon a metal can or bucket.

It would be denser than ordinary air, and internally would be at higher pressure.

When the ion generator is operated, the ionized air within the bag will self-repel and exert force upon the walls of the bag. What happens when "threads" of opposite polarity interact?

The charged air is all the same charge, it should repel itself and spray outwards from the needle tip in all directions. Remove the ion generator and bring a neutral object near the wire to see if a transparent "ion shell" repels the wire from the object via its pressure gradient.

My view is different. They would attract each other and might form a low-density semisolid, like a cross between aerogel and an ionic crystal such as sodium chloride.Ionic Compounds #2. Precipitation. The goal of this experiment is to help students understand precipitation reactions involving ionic compounds.

OBJECTIVES. Predict if a precipitate will form when two ionic solutions are mixed. Write total and net ionic equations for precipitation reactions.

In Part 1 of this experiment, you will learn to identify some of the common anions (negative ions) frequently encountered in the laboratory by testing the.

In this experiment you will determine what ions are present in a solution. To test for an ion, it must first be separated from other similar ions and then tested for.

his experiment involves the separation and identification of ions using two important reaction types: (i) the formation of complex ions and (ii) the amphoteric behavior of some metal hydroxides.

Los Angeles City College Chemistry 51 Fall 1 Experiment 7b Quantitative Analysis of Water INTRODUCTION In Part B, you will determine if certain ions are present in the water by chemically reacting these ions.

Or rather than ions, instead experiment with high humidity environments. Water vapor is a polar gas, and perhaps the high voltage electrodes can concentrate it or even provoke the formation of electrically stabilized aerogels made from water molecule chains or percolation structures.

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A experiment of ions
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